The Zebra Story (part 2)

July 15th, 2008

“Stop!!”

“Get out!!!”

“The zebras will kill you!!!”

His words froze us on the spot.

My mind began to spin.

Zebras?….. Kill me?!?…..

These thoughts repeated themselves and swam around inside my head, trying to latch onto something coherent.

It had never crossed my waking mind that zebras could be dangerous.

Or that walking up to them in their pen was anything but a good idea.

After all, the ranch owner had blithely smiled us on our way without so much as a backward glance.

Nothing had occurred to make us think zebras were any more dangerous than the occasional skittish, spitting llama with a penchant for kicking that we knew we could easily handle.

It wasn’t long before the man, who was still racing toward us, reached the gate we had recently entered.

He hastily climbed up on the fence and urged us to come back.

“Get out, senoritas!  Get out!” he called repeatedly with great urgency as he tried to catch his breath.

Without a word, the three of us retraced our steps and slowly exited through the gate he held open.

As I followed my Mom through the gate, I looked over my shoulder at the empty pasture we were leaving with an arched eyebrow.

Is he telling the truth?…..  It sure doesn’t look like we’re in danger…..

But there was no denying the sincerity of his evident concern for us, so I had no choice but to believe him.

“We’re sorry,” my Mother finally broke our collective silence, “We just wanted to see the zebras and were told they were down here somewhere.”

Now that we were safely out of the zebra pasture, the man (whom I assumed was a ranch hand), collapsed against the fence, removed his straw hat and began to fan his bronzed, sweaty face with it.

He nodded his head, but didn’t speak until his breathing had finally steadied.

“Yes,” he said quickly as he pushed away from the fence, “You want to see zebras.  Come, senoritas, I will take you.  I will put you up high safe.”

Then he motioned for us to follow him.

I gave my Mom a confused look as we walked behind the man.

Up high safe?” I whispered, “What does that mean?”

My Mom shrugged and quietly answered, “I don’t know.  I guess we’ll find out soon.”

Eventually, we came upon a backhoe and the man halted.

Pulling a key out of his pocket, he began climbing into the driver’s seat.

As he climbed, he pointed to the shovel at the front of the backhoe.

“Sit, sit!” he instructed us.

The three of us stared at the huge shovel in front of us.

“Sit in there?!” I exclaimed as I pointed at the muddy shovel that laid on the ground.

“Yes!” the man declared, now seated in the driver’s seat and starting the engine, “I will put you up high safe.  Then you will see zebras.”

I looked at my Mom with a gaping mouth.

She had a little grin on her face and a fun sense of adventure in her eyes.

Briefly meeting my eye, she shrugged and said, “Here goes!”

Then she bent down and sat in the shovel.

My sister said, “I can’t believe I’m doing this,” and followed my Mother’s example.

Hesitating, I looked from the man I didn’t know sitting up in the backhoe, to the muddy shovel in front of me, to the apparently empty pasture we’d just left.

This is just too weird, I thought as I finally settled into the shovel.

We held on tight as he slowly raised the shovel up off the ground, causing our feet to dangle over the sharp edge.

Then he kicked it in gear and we bumped along over the dirt and sagebrush back to the forbidden pasture.

It was too noisy to talk much, so my Mom, my sister and I just sat in our backhoe shovel and kept our eyes peeled for anything that resembled a zebra among the sagebrush and trees.

Then suddenly we all stiffened.

There they were.

Way off in the approaching distance, we saw them…..

To be continued…..

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8 Comments

charlotte | 7/16/2008 5:28 am

Heidi, you have lived an interesting life, girl! Can’t wait to hear the next part of this story:)

 
JS | 7/16/2008 6:09 am

This story just keeps going! It’s nice that the ranch hand was willing to take you and see the zebras in the bachoe! And it’s nice that you didn’t get killed or eaten alive! I can’t remember maybe you said before, but how old were you? You must have a good memory

 
dep | 7/16/2008 8:10 am

Did this story really happen or is it another wild tale or tail as the case may be??? thanks for continuing, please don’t stop. It is a good read whether it is real or not. I am not one to enjoy suspenders for very long!!! (in other words, I am not patient sometimes, it just depends)

 
apple | 7/16/2008 10:07 am

Wow…very intersting story!! I can’t wait to hear the rest of it.
Thank you for commenting over at my blog…I love to hear what other people have to say.

 
Melissa | 7/16/2008 10:50 am

Wow – you got to ride in the shovel of a backhoe? I’ve got a couple of boys who would sure like to hear more about that sometime! ;) You have lived an interesting life! Don’t leave us hanging for too long!

 
Suzanne | 7/16/2008 5:07 pm

Now I am waiting for the next part, wow what an adventure in itself to ride in the shovel of such a machine.

 
Wandering Nana-Linda | 7/17/2008 7:08 pm

Pictures, I want a picture. Do you realize what people would pay for that!!! Hey, I’m old and I don’t know how much longer I have… You have to finish the story so when I die I will have a smile on my face knowing the end of the story.

 
Vicki (Mom) | 7/17/2008 7:33 pm

The story is indeed true, every detail, because I was there. I have no idea how Heidi remembers all of those details except that she’s been that way since she was about 4. If we couldn’t remember something that had happened or the date of it when Heidi was growing up, we would ask Heidi to check her journal and it was always there in detail. I have pictures of the zebras…

 

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